Archive | Admissions

Future U. California students may be asked to declare sexual orientation

Future U. California students may be asked to disclose their sexual orientation upon accepting an admissions offer to a UC campus.

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Column: Continue considering race in college admissions

This fall the Supreme Court will return to an issue it last discussed in 2003: affirmative action in university admissions. Fisher v. The University of Texas at Austin involves a white student who, after being denied admission, claimed that the University’s consideration of race in the admissions process violated her civil and constitutional rights.

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Supreme Court to revisit landmark affirmative action decision

Supreme Court to revisit landmark affirmative action decision

The Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case concerning affirmative action at universities, putting the landmark 2003 decisions in Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger at risk of being overturned.

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U.S. Department of Education ends inquiry into Harvard admissions

The U.S. Department of Education has closed its investigation into alleged discrimination against Asian Americans in Harvard’s admissions policies following the withdrawal of the initial complaint, according to a department spokesperson.

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Study finds law schools look at social networking sites when evaluating applicants more often than other graduate schools

Law schools may be looking at applicants’ Facebook pages more often than other admissions offices, according to Kaplan Test Prep’s 2011 survey of college admissions officers. The study, released Oct. 24, surveyed undergraduate, business school and law school admissions officers from 359 different schools by phone during the summer.

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LGBT status acknowledged on college applications

LGBT status acknowledged on college applications

“Would you consider yourself a member of the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) community?” Elmhurst College, a private four-year institution in Illinois, made national headlines after including that question on its application this fall.

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USC welcomes most non-US freshman class

The fall 2011 freshman class will be the most international in the university’s history and for the first time under half the class is from California. Director of Admission Kirk Brennan attributed the increase in international students to more students’ applications and more students’ intent to come. He said admissions received approximately 4,400 international applications this year, compared to 3,500 last year. “There’s a trend nationally for international students to be coming to the U.S.,” Brennan said. “We offer a unique set of programs that attract international [students] and have been known to enroll international students at high levels for a long time.”

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Harvard class of 2011 includes first Wampanoag Indian graduate since 1665

When Tiffany L. Smalley ’11 receives her diploma at the Commencement ceremony on May 26, she will become the first Wampanoag Indian to graduate from Harvard College since 1665. During her four years at Harvard, Smalley, a government concentrator with a secondary in ethnic studies, was active in raising awareness of the Native American culture on campus.

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Social networking sites an asset to college admissions officers

Teresa Rudd wasn’t sure whether she wanted to attend NYU, but logging on to Facebook helped make her decision a little bit easier. “Social media helped attract me to NYU a little because talking to other people who were applying or people who were already at NYU made me more sure that it was where I wanted to go,” the incoming Steinhardt freshman said.

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Oregon House bill requires high schoolers to plot course for future

A bill passed by the state House of Representatives could keep Oregon’s high school students from obtaining diplomas unless they can demonstrate a clear intention to seek future education or job opportunities. House Bill 2732, which garnered House approval Monday, requires high school students to show proof of application to college, the U.S. armed forces or into an apprenticeship program in order to be eligible for a diploma.

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